Dynamic Warm Ups for Golfers

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To avoid injury and play your best, it is critical to warm-up before golfing. Static stretching (long holds in stretch positions) is great for overall flexibility, but doesn’t properly prepare you for a round of golf. Dynamic stretching is a much better way to warm-up and takes only 5 – 7 minutes. Hitting balls is a great dynamic warm-up as it helps with coordination and confidence, and is certainly recommended as part of a pre-round routine. It is, however, strongly recommended to perform a few minutes of dynamic warm-up BEFORE hitting the driving range. This eliminates the risk of taking bad swings before your muscles and joints are ready to go. Investing a few minutes before hitting the range is well worth the time.

Hold your driver overhead as wide as possible with your knees bent slightly. Twist your upper body side to side as far as possible while keeping your legs and hips still. Use your core stabilizers to prevent any lower body movement. Repeat 30 times to each side.

Hold a club at your side lightly for balance. Swing your opposite leg front to back 15 times. Repeat on the other side.

Inside Tap:
Bend your left knee and lift the inside of your left foot upward and inward to meet your right hand. Lower your left leg and bend your right knee to lift the inside of your right foot upward and inward to meet your left hand. Repeat 20 times on each side.

Outside Tap:
Bend your left knee to lift the outside of your left foot upward and outward to meet your left hand. Lower your left leg and then bend your right knee to lift the outside of your right foot upward and outward to meet your right hand. Repeat 20 times on each side. Crossover Twist: Hold your driver as wide as possible and bend forward at your hips. Shift your weight to the left (let your left knee bend) and twist your shoulders and spine to the left. Reach back as far as possible but stay where it’s comfortable. Return to center and shift your weight to the right (let your right knee bend) and twist your shoulders and spine to the right. Reach back as far as possible but stay where it’s comfortable. Repeat 20 times on each side.

Hold your driver as wide as you can and bend forward at the hips. Shift your weight to the left (let the left knee bend) and twist your shoulders and spine to the left. Reach back as far as you can within your comfort zone. Return to center and then shift your weight to the right (let the right knee bend) as you twist your shoulders and spine to the right. Reach back as far as you can but stay within your comfort zone. Repeat 20 times to each side.

Step back with your right foot and lunge downward as you reach your arms up. Repeat with the opposite side. Perform 20 times on each side. Pivot Twists: Hold your driver with a wide grip at shoulder level. Rotate your club horizontally to the right as your weight is shifted to the right, rising onto the left toe. Rotate back to center and continue the horizontal movement of the club to the left as your weight is shifted to the left and rise up onto the right toe. Repeat 30 times to each side.

Hold your driver with a wide grip at shoulder level. Rotate the club horizontally to the right as you shift your weight to the right, rising onto your left toe. Rotate back to center and continue the horizontal movement of the club to the left as you shift your weight to the left and rise up onto your right toe. Repeat 30 times to each side.

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