Patient Stories


Review us:
  1. My experience was very educational and met my needs specifically. Friendly staff!!

  2. Scott was very helpful in my recovery. Answered all my questions. Taught me things about PT – I wasn’t aware of it! Kind and encouraging during my time of treatment. Friendly, helpful staff as well.

  3. I came to TAI for discomfort in my new knee. The exercises and care given have taken all the discomfort out of my knee. I can do stairs and walk aways. My goal was to be able to keep walking. I reached my goal.

  4. Paul has been awesome to work with! After a labral repair surgery in May, and some physical therapy in my hometown, I was skeptical of my return to playing baseball. But, when I got back to school, I began seeing Paul in PT and I’m now much more confident thanks to him.

  5. I had a knee injury this year and had surgery to have a ligament to my knee cap repaired. My doctor said I needed physical therapy and I chose to go to Therapeutic Associates in Forest Grove. This was my very first time ever that I needed therapy in my 57 yrs. My physical therapist Maria Matson and the entire staff were great. They are compassionate and very knowledgeable about what I needed to do to get myself walking again, especially without a limp. I already have arthritis in this same knee and Maria was working to get me even stronger than I was before my injury. She had a great plan of stretches and exercises that I did there and at home. She also has encouraged me to do some yoga poses to help with my knee recovery as well as helping other areas to keep strong. She always asked me how I was doing and listened to what I said. If I wasn’t sure I did a stretch right, she would go over it with me again until I felt comfortable with it. I have been back to work now and able to enjoy everything I could do before my injury. Hopefully I won’t need physical therapy again, but if I do I will be sure to go here and I definitely recommend Therapeutic Associates in Forest Grove to anyone.

  6. I started seeing a physical therapist after I initially injured my back while working on our farm. What started as low back pain later spread down both of my legs, impacting predominately my right leg. I was diagnosed with Chronic Bilateral Sciatica. For approximately 15 months, I tried a wide variety of treatments. That included MRIs, steroid injections, opioid prescriptions, acupuncture, chiropractic treatments, massage therapy, and going to a Pain Clinic. The pain limited my ability to work and prevented me from doing the creative activities I enjoy. I’m a runner and tried to increase my exercise, but eventually the pain prevented me from exercising at all. Finally, a friend recommended me to a PT in Forest Grove — Scott Hein.

    My treatment with Scott was different than any other physical therapy or treatment I had received elsewhere. He asked more questions and assessed my physical condition more extensively than all the doctors I had seen previously. I, like many people, have not been exposed to this way of looking at pain. The “ways of thinking” that I learned from Scott, and the “Explain Pain” book he recommended, were life changing. Part of what was impeding my recovery was not being able to understand why I physically felt the way I did. I thought that my pain directly correlated with the seriousness of an undiagnosed mechanical problem in my back. I learned that this is not so, and that pain is not necessarily a manifestation of a truly physical/mechanical problem. Rather, pain may be a residual physiological memory of an injury that I had at one time, but already physically resolved.

    I am nearly 98% better than I was before I saw Scott!! I am able to do everything I could before I injured my back…EVERYTHING! There was a time when I thought I would not be able to return to sculpting, running, or farming. The concepts that I learned have affected other aspects of my life as well. Once I learned not to make a huge deal out of flare-up pain and accepted that it sometimes happens without being a sign of a relapse, I was able to relax about it and accept it as temporary. Pain and anxiety are partners in crime, and they feed off of one another. Anxiety makes pain’s incubator a lot more comfortable…enough so that pain will want to kick off its shoes and stay a little while. I learned that if I can reduce my anxiety, then I will inevitably reduce pain’s comfort and willingness to want to stick around.

    -Heidi Erickson

  7. I suffered a couple of injuries that later led to unexplained pain, which lasted for about seven years before I finally received some relief and answers. A shoulder injury, and later a foot injury, left me with unexplained pain and a body that was out of whack. I saw Doctors, chiropractors, an orthopedist, and other physical therapists, but received different answers to what was wrong and different approaches to my recovery. After a couple of cortisone shots in my foot that were unsuccessful, I had resigned myself to a new way of life in which I would try to walk as little as possible. With four kids to keep up with, that really didn’t work. My mom had had some success at Therapeutic Associates in Forest Grove and recommended them to me. So, out of desperation, I called and am so glad I did!

    My treatments included education on pain, along with an exercise routine I could do at home or the gym. The biggest difference was that they worked with me the whole time and educated me on pain as they manually treated me. They had me take home books and study them. They used drawings and prepared worksheets so that I could really understand. They encouraged me to ask questions on anything I didn’t understand or was facing in my own body. My physical therapy experience was better than I expected, because it put me in charge of the pain and helped me develop an action plan in case I experience pain again.

    Physical therapy changed my life. Understanding that pain can occur even though the body tissues have healed helps me know I am not going crazy, my body is not degenerating, and I am not making it up. I was so afraid to walk that I would choose activities that didn’t require me to walk. Now, I walk wherever I need to. Pain, in its original design, helps us stay safe by sensors in the body alerting the brain to control pain. The problem is when the body stays in that alert mode. Even though the body is not in danger, it sends the wrong message to the brain. This is not to say that “it’s all in your head,” as in, “you’re making this all up.” Rather, the brain can be retrained to not be on alert all the time. For the first time I felt that I was understood, AND I had hope that I would not have to alter my lifestyle because of pain.

    -Jennifer Loeffler