Scott Hein 2021

Scott Hein

PT, DPT

Clinic Director | Physical Therapist

About

Scott graduated with his doctoral degree in Physical Therapy from Pacific University in 2003. He received his bachelor degree from the University of Oregon in Exercise & Movement Science in 2000. Scott worked as a physical therapist in orthopedics for 4 years in Salem-Keizer, Oregon and became the director of Therapeutic Associates Inc., Forest Grove in June 2007.

Scott has been active in his pursuit of continuing education and in 2011 he sat for the American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties exam. Scott passed his examination, becoming a Board Certified Orthopaedic Specialist. This certification recognizes Scott as a specialist within his field, demonstrating “advanced clinical knowledge, skill and experience in orthopedics.” He has completed certification through Level II of the North American Institute of Manual Therapy and has finished coursework through Level III advanced seminars. In 2016, Scott completed 6 months of intensive coursework to become certified as a Therapeutic Pain Specialist. Completion of this program ensures that a Physical Therapist is utilizing the most up-to-date information and clinical advancements to assist patients in pain.

In his free time, Scott enjoys spending time with family, camping, mountain biking, and music.

Board Certifications

Board Certified Clinical Specialist in Orthopaedic Physical Therapy

Additional Certifications

Therapeutic Pain Specialist

Education

Pacific University, Doctorate of Physical Therapy

Recent Blog Posts

Our educational blogs draw on the expertise and experience of our therapists, bringing you the information you need to pursue an active, healthy, and pain-free life.
“I think I have a pinched nerve.” This something that as a Physical Therapist, I’ve heard many times from patients over the years. Often this is not the case, but sometimes it is. Let’s look more into what a pinched nerve really is – what it feels like, what causes it, and how to treat it.
Taking care of yourself by exercising regularly, getting enough sleep, practicing mindfulness, and working with a physical therapist to address and understand pain can all help to reduce and often eliminate pain, even in the presence of arthritis.
Whether you step on a nail, stub your toe, or are agonized by back pain and sciatica for 10 years … pain is an experience that occurs in the brain. So, while injury and irritation do occur at other parts of the body, it is the brain that actually controls if you will experience pain or not.

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