Question:

My doctor told me I had Osgood-Schlatters disease. I am 22 years old and I have not grown for a long time so I am wondering why this is happening to me and what can I do to stop this? Everything I’ve read just says it’ll stop when I stop growing but that’s for teenagers so when will it stop for me?”


Answer:

I’m sorry to hear that you are experiencing this knee pain. Without doing a thorough examination I’m not able to comment on your specific condition. Osgood Schlatter’s is typically seen in adolescent athletes and is usually coupled with a growth spurt. It can be caused by repetitive contractions from the thigh muscles pulling on their insertion point at the front of the knee. This causes increased stress on the growth plate and contributes to the bony bump that is often seen in patients who have Osgood-Schlatter’s disease. Growth spurts can also cause these symptoms due to bones lengthening faster than muscle can lengthen, causing increased tightness resulting in increased tension on the front of the knee. This irritation typically stops after adolescence once the growth plate has closed and the individual has stopped growing, but the bump will not go away. Typically the bony bump does not continue to cause individuals discomfort after they are done growing, but it can make it uncomfortable to kneel.

There are other causes of knee pain that can present similar to Osgood-Schlatter’s disease. For example, patellofemoral pain syndrome or patella tendonitis typically cause pain in the front of the knee and are seen in adults. I would recommend that you see a physical therapist for an evaluation to assess the knee in addition to joints above and below, lower extremity muscle length, and proper thigh muscle control to figure out what is causing increased irritation in the knee.


**This reply is for informational purposes only. It’s not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician, physical therapist, or other qualified health provider with a medical condition.